Category Archives: Teaching and TAing

Tips for Teaching: From Carly

As part of the new student orientation for the department, Jake Wobig and I were asked to talk briefly about teaching and give advice to folks who might be landing in the classroom for the first time this semester. Jake … Continue reading

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Alternatives to lecturing in college classrooms

Tomorrow I will be presenting to the UNL grad students on teaching skills and I thought I would put a few things on the blog to serve as a reference or as a starting point for those who want to … Continue reading

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So you’re thinking about law school…

Then you should read this blog post titled “Why Do Harvard Kids Head to Wall Street?” from James Kwak.  He is discussing why a group of mostly public-minded students end up working in finance and corporate law, and his description … Continue reading

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Students self-grading

Here is a very interesting article about an attempt at Duke to have students grade each other in a small seminar.  According the article, it worked well there.  This obviously makes me wonder whether it could work at a big … Continue reading

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Miniature book review: Steven Cahn on graduate school and academia

I just read political theorist Steven Cahn’s recent book “Student to Scholar: A Candid Guide to Becoming a Professor,” and I thought I’d mention it on the blog.  First, this is a pretty good book and I recommend it to … Continue reading

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Overview of recent research on terrorism

The New Yorker has a great book review today that briefly describes several of the most influential academic works on terrorism from recent years.  If you are needing background material for a lecture on terrorism, or are looking for a … Continue reading

Posted in Comparative Politics, International Relations, Teaching and TAing | Leave a comment

Income, Democracy, and Punctuated Equilibria

I’m teaching Intro to International Relations this semester and tonight is our first class meeting.  In my introductory lecture I’m using lots of graphs and maps from Gapminder and from the World Freedom Atlas, both excellent and free online resources … Continue reading

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