Category Archives: Philosophy of Science and Epistemology

Why Experts Get Things Wrong

An interesting article from the Atlantic that I thought I’d pass on.  Experts get things wrong, which is no surprise, but the interesting bit is that they tend to get things more wrong when they focus on methods of decision … Continue reading

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Hazards of statistical inference, Part … ah who knows anymore?

The New Yorker has a very interesting piece about the hazards of publication bias and skewed data in the hard sciences, particularly medicine and biology.  Recommended. Apparently there is a phenomenon in which effect sizes for established causal correlations decrease … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy of Science and Epistemology, Statistics | 2 Comments

Authoritarian governments and sketchy statistics

As if research on war, development and human rights in the 3rd World was not already difficult enough, this piece from the Guardian makes a pretty good case that perhaps we should not take many of the statistics available on … Continue reading

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On the decline of general philosophy of science

This philosophy of science blog (was going to abbreviate, but then realized what the acronym also stands for…) has much discussion of the decline in dedicated philosophers in this field. Simply put, though there are still field-specific practitioners of PhilSci … Continue reading

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The Absurdly Artificial Divide Between Pure and Applied Research – Olivia Judson Blog – NYTimes.com

Guest Column: The Absurdly Artificial Divide Between Pure and Applied Research – Olivia Judson Blog – NYTimes.com. An interesting real-life example of the duel that often occurs within the pursuit of scientific knowledge. Though it deals with biological science, it … Continue reading

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BdM, rational choice, and forecasting

I found this article today on BdM’s efforts to use rational choice to forecast political events.  I was interested because when Dr. Miller, Randy and I had breakfast last Friday with Dr. Vasquez, this is all Miller and Vasquez talked … Continue reading

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Rational Choice

So I’m going to try this out. I’m thinking about rational choice today since it’s one of our topics in the Comparative Core today, and I read last night that Tsebelis believes “Instead of the concept of rationality as a … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy of Science and Epistemology | Tagged , | 4 Comments